Moral philosophers most of spend their time studying and discussing what it means for a person or an act to qualify as moral. One might assume that all this reflection on matters of good and bad, and right and wrong, would make professional ethicists behave morally better than socially comparable non-ethicists. Yet that’s not what some research suggests: On Ethicists’ courtesy at philosophy conferences, as recently published in Philosophical Psychology, philosophers Eric Schwitzgebel and Joshua Rust report on a study that suggests that audiences in ethics sessions do not behave any better than those attending seminars on other areas of philosophy. Not when it comes to talking audibly whilst a speaker is addressing the room and not when it comes to “allowing the door…